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Showing posts from April, 2015

The Weight of My Words

The career that I chose as a freelance public speaker obviously involves a lot of talking, more so for the past two months. I am probably home only a few days before I have to be on the road again.

I am physically exhausted by the commute from Perlis to elsewhere, emotionally exhausted by the separation from my family, and most importantly, I am spiritually exhausted by the tongue I can't seem to put to rest.

Today I have some time to reflect, before my next talk. I am thinking about all the things that I said in the past two months and about why I said them. It is not enough for me to say good things, delivering good messages to people, if I forgot (or abandon) the point of it all.

The simpleton in me wants to simply convince me that it is okay. I am doing a good thing, therefore I don't have to worry about anything. But the sapient in me wants to remind me not to take anything for granted. Therefore, I do have to worry.

I worry about my words. I worry whether or not I say th…

Book Notes: Simplicity Parenting | Chapter Two: Soul Fever

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Chapter Two: Soul Fever

1. The author used the term "soul fever" to illustrate the imbalance state of the child's mental and emotional wellbeing. The author explained the concept and the healing approach to soul fever by giving an analogy of a typical physical fever.

2. When our child experiences physical fever, we go through a process to facilitate healing. We notice the illness, we stop our normal routine, we focus more on the ill child, and we provide the child with the most conducive environment for healing to take place.

3. The author noted that we are not causing any healing. We are just providing the child with an atmosphere of support and allowing the child the time and the space needed for the healing process to take place.

4. This is very similar to a soul fever. Once the fever kicks in, our parental instincts can detect something is wrong. Noticing is the first step and it is an important one. It shows the child that you care. One of the worst things to do t…